You can rent Sandra Bullock’s swanky West Hollywood condo for $22K per month

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It’s one of two units she owns in the building

Oscar-winning actress Sandra Bullock has not one, but two, units in West Hollywood’s exclusive Sierra Towers condo complex—and Variety reports that one of them is available for rent.

The privilege of having Bullock as a landlord won’t come cheap though; the fully-furnished, two-bedroom unit is asking a hefty $22,000 per month.

Featuring three bathrooms and nearly 1,700 square feet of living space, the 22nd-floor unit is illuminated by walls of glass and offers excellent views around the city. Once the property of Friends actor Matthew Perry, it was purchased by Bullock in 2014 for $3.35 million.

It’s not too surprising the condo has had multiple celebrity owners. Since its construction in 1965, the building has been a magnet for Hollywood stars lured in by its central location and 24-hour security. Residents past and present include Elton John, Courtney Cox, Cher, Lindsay Lohan, and Sidney Poitier.

Building amenities include a swimming pool, fitness center, and valet parking for residents.

Another property owned by Bullock—a three-bedroom home in the Hollywood Hills—also appeared on the rental market earlier this year. Complete with a heated pool and spa, that residence was asking a comparatively paltry $15,000 per month.

Curbed Cup 1st round results: Westlake edges out East Hollywood in incredibly close race

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See the full bracket revealed for the first time

The first round of Los Angeles’s Curbed Cup has come to a close, with this year’s preliminary match-ups yielding both nail-biters and decisive defeats.

No. 8 North Hollywood put up a good fight, but ultimately lost to No. 9 Chinatown, which captured 54 percent of the votes.

No. 11 Burbank won 52 percent of the votes, narrowly defeating its opponent No. 6 Exposition Park.

But the closest race of all was the battle between No. 13 Westlake and No. 4 East Hollywood. The race was tied for a while, but in the end, Westlake managed to eke out a win, earning 50.84 percent of the votes.

Not every pairing was a neck-and-neck race to the finish line. No. 1 San Pedro blew the doors off No. 16 Westchester, with the port neighborhood earning 73 percent of the votes.

No. 12 downtown Long Beach dispatched with its opponent, No. 5 Venice, without breaking a sweat: 64 precent of voters felt that Long Beach’s downtown deserved to advance.

No. 3 South Park faced off against No. 14 Studio City, and won with 61 percent of the votes.

No. 10 Hollywood outshined No. 7 Boyle Heights, with the former capturing the hearts and votes of 60 percent of voters. No. 2 Koreatown trounced No. 15 Sawtelle with nearly 67 percent of the votes.

That was just the first round. There’s more friendly neighborhood competition to come. The bracket below shows which eight neighborhoods get to move onto the next round of heated competition as Curbed Cup continues.

Renters win fight against condo conversion in Hancock Park

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The units were expected to sell for more than $1 million each

Tenants of a small rental property on the western edge of Hancock Park scored a victory this week when they successfully appealed the conversion of their building into condos.

In a unanimous decision, the Central Area Planning Commission voted to uphold the appeal, filed by residents of the building and members of the Los Angeles Tenants Union.

Dozens of supporters were in attendance at the meeting and urged the commission to preserve the building’s four units as rentals protected by the city’s Rent Stabilization Ordinance.

“I don’t think you should approve any of this before you have more affordable programs,” said Los Angeles resident J.T. Lawson, who told the commission that he had been evicted under the Ellis Act, which allows landlords to remove rent-controlled units from the market when demolishing properties or undertaking condo conversions.

“Stop here,” he said.

Representatives of the building owners argued that Ellis Act proceedings had already begun and that tenants would be entitled to relocation stipends of between $8,050 and $20,050.

“This does not mean homelessness,” said Linda Hollenbeck, an attorney for the owners.

But tenants of the building maintained they were given no realistic way to remain in their units, with projected sale prices for the condos projected between $1 million and $1.15 million. Rental prices for other apartments in the area were similarly restrictive, they said (residents of the building now pay between $1,950 and $2,441, according to a report from the planning department).

Under Los Angeles law, condo conversions can be blocked when the vacancy rate in an area falls below 5 percent.

Planning staff argued that, though the area’s vacancy rate is less than that 5 percent threshold, the project’s four units would not have a “cumulative effect” on the overall rental market.

The commissioners disagreed.

“The loss of units through projects like this does start to be concerning,” said Commissioner Lys Mendez. “In a planning area that has … 14 percent of the city’s RSO units, the loss of rent-controlled units seems to have a negative impact on housing stock.”

With the project defeated, the building’s tenants still face an uncertain future. As planners pointed out during the hearing, the property owners could still vacate the units and raze the property, or simply wait and resubmit an application for a condo conversion.

In announcement Thursday, the LA Tenants Union promised that tenants would continue to fight the evictions going forward.

Goodyear Blimp has a huge new hangar in Carson

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It’s inflatable!

Drivers taking the 405 through Carson may notice an odd new structure near the intersection with the 110 freeway this week—one that looks a bit like an enormous bouncy castle.

That would be the new home of the Goodyear Blimp, erected overnight at the company’s blimp base Wednesday. Appropriately, the 337-foot-long hangar is fully inflatable and maintains its structure through the use of 20 fans.

By Goodyear’s estimation, the hangar, which rises nine stories in height and is comprised of more than 73 miles of PVC-coated polyester fabric, is the largest structure of its kind in North America. It will house Wingfoot Two, the company’s newest airship, which replaced the 31-year-old Spirit of Innovation earlier this year.

That blimp generally sat tied down in a field when not in use, but Wingfoot Two—which is technically a rigid airship, not a blimp—will need a bit more protection from the elements.

Right now, the cavernous hangar sits empty, but the airship its designed to house is slated to arrive Friday from its temporary home in Long Beach, according to the Associated Press.

Workers flatten out the hangar material
Fan inflating the hangar
Hangar inflating
Inside the hangar

Curbed Cup 1st round: (2) Koreatown vs. (15) Sawtelle

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Which neighborhood should advance? Vote now!

The Curbed Cup, our annual award for the neighborhood of the year, is kicking off with 16 neighborhoods vying for the prestigious (fake) trophy. We’ll reveal each of the neighborhoods this week, and polls will be open for 24 hours so you can cast your vote as to which ones should advance. Let the eliminations commence!


Koreatown

If we had one word to sum up Koreatown, it might be “overwhelming.” The busy neighborhood has so much to see and do, it can be hard to decide where to start.

A trip to the spa? A bit of bulgogi? Dumplings? Soondae? Maybe you’d prefer to catch a show at the Wiltern? Or drive golf balls into a big net right off Wilshire Boulevard?

Koreatown packs a lot into a relatively small area, and now developers are trying to pack dozens of new projects into that same space. Among the highlights: a condo and hotel next to the historic Wilshire Galleria, a museum (with housing attached) dedicated to Korean American culture and history, and a massive mixed use project partly developed by the county.

The walkable neighborhood is already home to three subway stations and iconic Los Angeles landmarks like the Bullocks Wilshire Building, the soaring Wilshire Boulevard Temple, and, of course, Jerry Seinfeld’s apartment building.

Sawtelle

A post shared by Elías Varón (@elias.varon) on Aug 20, 2017 at 8:59pm PDT

One of the more low-key areas on the Westside, Sawtelle is a haven of Japanese culture and cuisine that’s easy to walk around. And, thanks to the recently completed Expo Line extension, it’s a bit more transit-friendly as well.

Developers seem to be gravitating toward the area lately, and an affordable housing complex, a boutique hotel, and a residential project close to the train are all now in the works.

A foodie’s paradise, Sawtelle also attracts plenty of film snobs, with the lovely Nuart Theatre and the nearby Cinefile video store (still hanging in there after 18 years in business).

Further down the block is Touch Vinyl, one of LA’s best record stores, and a couple spots to pick up used and rare books. What more could one ask for?

New plans could reshape 19 miles of the LA River, from Vernon to Long Beach

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They call for 146 new projects around the river

Plans for the reinvention of the Los Angeles River and the public spaces around it aren’t in short supply lately, with parks, bridges, bike paths, and bridges with parks all in the works at different locations along the 51-mile body of water.

Often neglected in these plans is the 19-mile stretch of river that runs from Vernon to Long Beach, where the river empties into the latter city’s harbor. But that changed last week when the Lower Los Angeles River Working Group released a draft plan for the revitalization of the river’s southern segment.

A collection of community groups, elected officials, and business organizations, the working group was convened by the state in 2016 to oversee efforts to make the river a stronger community resource.

The plans unveiled a week ago call for 146 individual projects in and around the river, including new trails, parks, crossings, and more. Among those proposals are seven “signature projects” that have been analyzed in greater detail. They include:

  • Development of new green space, public art displays, and affordable housing around Cudahy Park
  • Addition of park space, trails, and a dirt bike facility around the Atlantic Boulevard crossing in Vernon
  • A trio of park-topped bridges, new landscaping, and a band shell at the Rio Hondo confluence in the city of South Gate
  • Floating boardwalks above the soft-bottomed portion of the river that flows through Long Beach and new access to the levee at Willow Street
  • Pathways, recreation areas, and links to existing bike trails at the stretch of river between Greenleaf and Del Amo boulevards
  • New crossings, rest areas, public art space, and a nature overlook at Compton Creek
  • A new park, expanded wetlands, new stormwater capture facilities, and an amphitheater around Wrigley Heights in northern Long Beach
 Lower LA River Revitalization Plan
A diagram of the plans for Cudahy Park

More broadly, the plans also call for greater access to the concrete channel itself, including the addition of terraced seating and ramps that would allow people to explore the riverbed in certain areas.

The working group proposes streetscape changes to make it easier for residents to access the river (these could include new protected bike lanes, pedestrian-friendly sidewalk improvements, and even horse trails in some places).

But not everyone is entirely happy with the draft plans.

In a statement released earlier this week, Los Angeles Waterkeeper director Bruce Reznik argues that the proposed plan “represents a missed opportunity to tackle Lower LA River revitalization holistically.”

Reznik maintains that the proposed projects emphasize beautification and new development over ecological restoration and reduction of flood risk for the communities surrounding the river.

“In the aftermath of more severe storms and increasing flooding like we saw in Houston this August, it is the height of irresponsibility to continue building to the banks of the LA River,” says Reznik.

 Lower LA River Revitalization Plan
Plans call for boardwalks in the soft-bottomed part of the river in Long Beach

Stephen Mejia, policy and advocacy manager for Friends of the Los Angeles River (a member of the working group), says the report is “an important first step” in the river’s revitalization, but he acknowledges that more work is needed to perfect the plan.

“The rush to deliver” the report has “truncated the space for community to voice their vision, and sidelined some of the most important breakthroughs,” he says in a statement to Curbed. Mejia argues that the opportunity for public comment on the plans should be extended beyond the January 11 deadline.

The working group has held dozens of public meetings and community events to discuss the project, but numbers reported in the draft plans suggest community awareness of the project may be low. Workshops, pop-up booths, and bike tours have drawn fewer than 800 residents and only 420 responses were recorded in an online survey about the project.

“We would like there to be more community input,” says Michael Atkins, communications and impact manager for FOLAR. “We’re pushing for [the plans] to be as ambitious as possible.”

Meryl Streep snags beautiful 1950s post and beam in Pasadena for $3.6M

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The midcentury modern home last sold in the ’60s

Someone seems to have tipped Hollywood off about Pasadena’s underrated collection of midcentury modern residences.

Earlier this month, comedian Kristen Wiig paid just under $3 million for the revamped Case Study House #10; now, Variety reports that none other than Meryl Streep has purchased a stylish 1959 post and beam in the area.

Designed by architects Whitney Smith and Wayne Williams, the 3,087-square-foot home has three bedrooms and three bathrooms. It made its first appearance on the market last year since the 1960s with an asking price of $4.75 million—and there it sat until Streep picked it up for a reported $3.6 million.

The lovely home has glass walls and vaulted ceilings, with original windows and doors. The cavernous living room is framed around a tall stone fireplace.

The home sits on nearly two acres, with a swimming pool and views across the city and on to the San Gabriel mountains in the distance. Featuring bits of Japanese influence, the house frames a central courtyard and garden with pathways and a wraparound deck.

Variety notes that Streep and husband Don Gummer normally keep to the East Coast, making this a rare Los Angeles-area real estate transaction for the couple (though Streep briefly owned the Honnold & Rex-designed Research House in the Hollywood Hills). For a Southern California crash pad, this one is pretty hard to beat.

Curbed Cup 1st round: (3) South Park vs. (14) Studio City

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Which neighborhood should advance? Vote now to decide!

The Curbed Cup, our annual award for the neighborhood of the year, is kicking off with 16 neighborhoods vying for the prestigious (fake) trophy. We’ll reveal each of the neighborhoods this week, and polls will be open for 24 hours so you can cast your vote as to which ones should advance. Let the eliminations commence!


South Park

Every year, Downtown LA’s fastest growing neighborhood climbs higher, and the flurry of development doesn’t seem likely to end any time soon. By our count, at least 27 projects are in the works in the busy area.

At least one of those developments will bring some badly needed green space to the neighborhood, and renovations to Broadway’s Julia Morgan-designed Herald Examiner building will add a new outpost for popular eatery République.

But you don’t have to look into the future to see that transformation is underway in South Park.

More of the much-hyped Metropolis megaproject came online this year, including the swanky Hotel Indigo, and amenity-rich condo tower Ten50 opened its doors to dozens of eager residents. The quickly fancifying neighborhood is also now home to the “most expensive” penthouse in the city.

Plenty walkable and transit friendly, South Park is also chock full of interesting restaurants and bars, with easy access to live entertainment venues (and, of course, the Staples Center). It’s a great place to live—if you can afford it.

Studio City

Studio City was LA’s original master-planned development, built around an actual movie studio and created as a middle-class bedroom community for those could be “lured by the promise of an easy commute into LA on the newly paved Riverside Drive.”

The neighborhood continues be a single-family stronghold, though it seems more high-end than middle class now. Improvements are coming to the neighborhood’s riverside areas slowly but surely.

Hanging in the balance are a few potentially major projects for Studio City. One, the Sportsmen’s Lodge revamp that would bring shops and eateries to the site of a popular events center, remains stalled.

The other is the Weddington Golf and Tennis site. The long-time owners of the property had planned to build housing on part of the site. Neighbors protested; some had long hoped for a park on the site. It was not to be: In October, the owners sold their property to the Harvard-Westlake school.

The school plans to turn the site into a community athletic center, which should be at least partially open to the public. (At the same time, Harvard-Westlake gave up the battle to build a hated parking garage and skybridge near their school.)

Council approves ‘linkage fees’ on developers to pay for affordable housing

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The new fees could bring in over $100 million annually

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s proposal to charge fees to developers that would pay for affordable housing won the full support of the City Council on Wednesday.

“This is simply one tool that is needed to deal with a friggin’ huge problem,” Councilmember Gil Cedillo said just before the unanimous vote to approve the measure.

In the works for more than two years, the new “linkage fee” is expected to bring in up to $104.4 million annually, according to the planning department. That revenue would be used to finance construction of around 1,500 units of affordable housing per year—more than the 1,353 units built in all of 2015.

A coalition of housing advocates and religious leaders gathered with councilmembers José Huizar, Mike Bonin, and David Ryu outside City Hall this morning to support the measure, which they argued would help address a housing shortage that’s contributed to soaring rents and rising levels of homelessness.

A recent report from the nonprofit California Housing Partnership Corporation found that Los Angeles would need to build more than 500,000 units of affordable housing in order to meet demand from very low and extremely low-income earners.

The fees charged to developers of residential buildings would be between $8 and $15 per square foot, while commercial developers would pay $3 to $5 per square foot for new projects.

Developers and business groups have argued that the fees, similar to those charged in other California cities like San Diego and San Fransisco, would discourage new construction—exacerbating the city’s housing shortage.

Critics of the measure, however, were nowhere to be found at City Hall Wednesday, where a large crowd of supporters packed the council chambers.

Iisha Jones, resident manager at Venice Community Housing told the council that the nonprofit affordable housing provider was in desperate need of new units for residents struggling to find housing.

“People are waiting years for an opportunity [to find housing] and may never get a chance,” she said.

“You only have to step outside to see we have a housing crisis,” said local resident Vicki Kirschenbaum. “Developers benefit greatly from projects in our city; it’s time they give back.”

Many in attendance at the meeting urged the council to adopt a motion increasing fees to $18 per square foot in pricey “high market” areas like Hollywood and West LA. The council asked city staff to study the feasibility of making this change in the future.

Councilmember Joe Buscaino said that a tiered fee structure could attract more construction in lower income areas that developers might otherwise ignore.

“I want a piece of that action,” he said, referring to new projects rising outside of his southern council district. “From Watts to the waterfront, we have to develop.”

The council also asked staff to report back on the possibility of exempting housing built for middle-income earners (those making between 80 percent and 120 percent of LA’s median income) from the linkage fees.

Equipped with a new source of funding, the city should have an easier time meeting Mayor Garcetti’s goal of building 100,000 units of housing by 2021, but the cash won’t start rolling in just yet.

Under the ordinance approved Wednesday, the city won’t start collecting fees from developers for another 120 days, with fees gradually being phased in over the next year after that.

City Council approves Angels Landing plan that would bring 88-story tower, elementary school to Bunker Hill

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The dual-tower proposal would also include an open area over the Pershing Square subway entrance

Editor’s note: This story was originally published on December 12. It has been updated throughout to reflect the latest information.

The Los Angeles City Council has unanimously approved a $1.2-billion plan from developers Claridge Properties, MacFarlane Partners, and The Peebles Corporation for the redevelopment of the Bunker Hill site now dubbed Angels Landing.

The project, designed by Handel Architects, would fill the site with an 88-story skyscraper and a 24-story tower. Fill up those high-rises would be 500 SLS and Mondrian hotel rooms, 250 condos, open space, shops and restaurants, and a charter elementary school.

With this project, “we’re getting the Downtown we’ve always wanted, the Downtown that doesn’t shut down at 5 p.m.,” Councilmember Jose Huizar said at the council meeting today.

A recent report from the Chief Legislative Analyst, first spotted by Urbanize LA, was the first to recommend the developers; the choice was also approved by the economic development committee yesterday.

The developers, who’ve partnered for the project under the banner Angels Landing Partners LLC, were one of three teams vying for a chance to build on the city-controlled site, at the northwest corner of Fourth and Hill streets.

Angels Landing Partners’ project would also bring 400 apartments to the Angels Flight-adjacent site. Five percent—or 20 units—would be available to households making 80 to 120 percent of the area median income; that’s roughly $72,000 to $108,000 for a family of four.

Angels Landing Partners was the only prospective team to explicitly mention affordable housing in its plan.

Designed by landscape architecture firm Olin, the project’s open space would measure 54,000 square feet. The Pershing Square subway entrance on the corner would be surrounded by a plaza-type area that leads into the development.

The Chief Legislative Office took into consideration the development team, the project, the financial capabilities, and the plan for community outreach that each development proposal put forth.

The developers proposed a purchase price of $50 million for the site—a bit more than the property’s $45.7 million assessed value—though that could change. The agreement between the city and the CRA/LA says that the property has to sell for its “fair market value,” so the property will be assessed once more and that amount will be the new minimum purchase price for the site, the chief legislative analyst’s report says.

The project isn’t expected to be complete until 2024. Developers expect a two-year design period followed by 41 months of construction.

Elegant 1930s Monterey Colonial in Los Feliz seeking $2.075M

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A graceful blend of old and new

Now classing up the market is this gracious Monterey Colonial in the Franklin Hills of Los Feliz.

Built in 1937, the three-story home has been polished and updated, but happily, still retains plenty of vintage character. Measuring 2,979 square feet, it contains four bedrooms and three baths, including one with lovely original tile and fixtures.

Other selling points include a step down living room with fireplace and original moldings, French doors and windows, wrought-iron details, hardwood floors, built-ins, a top-floor balcony, and a bougainvillea-shaded front courtyard.

Per the listing description, “the garden level of the home is complete with 4th bedroom, kitchenette and play/work room with access to the flat rear yard.”

On a 5,000-square-foot lot, the property is asking $2.075 million.

Seven-story apartment complex planned for Olympic and Hoover

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173 units and plenty of commercial space

A planned development may soon bring 173 new apartments and commercial space to a vacant lot at the edge of Westlake and Pico-Union.

The Los Angeles Planning Commission is set to review the project Thursday. Located at the northwest corner of Olympic Boulevard and Hoover Street (the occasional home of the Ramos Brothers Circus), it would rise seven stories and include 36,990 square feet of commercial space distributed across the first three levels.

20 of the project’s apartments would be set aside for very low-income residents (those making under half of LA’s median income). In return, the developer is requesting a 35 percent density bonus, allowing for 43 more units than would have otherwise been permitted on the site.

Parking for 262 automobiles and 231 bikes would be provided in a subterranean parking garage and a ground-floor lot.

Renderings of the project, which is being designed by M2A Architects, show that it would have an interesting angular shape, with balconies and walkways protruding from the side of the building. The third level would include an open courtyard space overlooking Olympic Boulevard and multiple amenity decks would include features for residents like a swimming pool, fitness center, and lounge area.

Several other projects may also be popping up in the area before long. A hotel with 150 rooms is planned just a bit to the east at Olympic and Alvarado, while a seven-story complex with 228 units of housing is set to rise at Olympic and Vermont to the west.

A project timeline for the Olympic and Hoover project does not appear to have been established yet, but plans indicate it would take about two years to construct.

Aerial rendering of Olympic/Hoover
Olympic/Hoover seen from street
Swimming pool at Olympic/Hoover

Committee backs Angels Landing plan that would bring 88-story tower, elementary school to Bunker Hill

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The dual-tower proposal would also include an open area over the Pershing Square subway entrance

Editor’s note: This story was originally published at 1:24 p.m. It has been updated throughout to reflect the latest information.

The Los Angeles City Council’s economic and development committee unanimously backed today a $1.2-billion plan from developers Claridge Properties, MacFarlane Partners, and The Peebles Corporation for the redevelopment of the Bunker Hill site now dubbed Angels Landing.

“By overseeing the development of Angel’s Landing, the city of Los Angeles is doing all we can to maximize this development and make sure some of Downtown Los Angeles’ greatest needs, such as hotels, schools and open space, are included in this project,”councilmember Jose Huizar said in a statement.

The next step is to secure the approval of the full City Council.

The committee’s vote follows a recent report from the Chief Legislative Analyst, which recommends the developers, who’ve partnered for the project under the banner Angels Landing Partners LLC. They are one of three teams vying for a chance to build on the site, which is controlled by the city.

Urbanize LA first spotted the report, which affects the future of a site at the northwest corner of Fourth and Hill streets, bordered to the north by the Angels Flight funicular.

In October, Angels Landing Partners presented a plan designed by Handel Architects that would fill the site with an 88-story skyscraper and a 24-story tower. Fill up those high-rises would be 500 SLS and Mondrian hotel rooms, 250 condos, open space, shops and restaurants, and a charter elementary school.

The project would also hold 400 apartment. Five percent—or 20 units—would be available to households making 80 to 120 percent of the area median income; that’s roughly $72,000 to $108,000 for a family of four.

Angels Landing Partners was the only prospective team to explicitly mention affordable housing in its plan.

Designed by landscape architecture firm Olin, the open space would measure 54,000 square feet. The Pershing Square subway entrance on the corner would be surrounded by a plaza-type space that leads into the development.

The Chief Legislative Office took into consideration the development team, the project, the financial capabilities, and the plan for community outreach that each development proposal put forth.

The developers proposed a purchase price of $50 million for the site—a bit more than the property’s $45.7 million assessed value—though that could change. The agreement between the city and the CRA/LA says that the property has to sell for its “fair market value,” so the property will be assessed once more and that amount will be the new minimum purchase price for the site, the chief legislative analyst’s report says.

The project isn’t expected to be complete until 2024. Developers expect a two-year design period followed by 41 months of construction.

Curbed Cup 1st round: (4) East Hollywood vs. (13) Westlake

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Which neighborhood should advance? Vote now for your favorite!

The Curbed Cup, our annual award for the neighborhood of the year, is kicking off with 16 neighborhoods vying for the prestigious (fake) trophy. We’ll reveal each of the neighborhoods this week, and polls will be open for 24 hours so you can cast your vote as to which ones should advance. Let the eliminations commence!


East Hollywood

This neighborhood, literally on the eastern edge of Hollywood, is slowly morphing into a food-lovers destination. Residents lucky enough to live here have long had easy access to khao soi, kanom krok, and pad-see-ew served up at the restaurants in Thai Town. Now restaurant additions are giving the neighborhood even more food credibility, including Kismet and Friends and Family, not to mention the addition of such neighborhood joints as Tabula Rasa. (Shoutout to The Knowhere Bar, which finally got a liquor license!)

Indeed, as one nominator pointed out: “That stretch of restaurants, coffee shops, wine bars, etc., that has recently proliferated along Hollywood Blvd. just west of Western is great to see.”

Hundreds of new units of housing are being built right now, mostly along Hollywood Boulevard, in close proximity to the Hollywood and Western stop on the subway’s Red Line.

The neighborhood’s other big advantage: green space! The northern portion of the community can easily saunter into Griffith Park and Barnsdall Park. There’s still no Target though ….

Westlake

A post shared by Alex Kessel (@alexkessel) on Dec 11, 2017 at 6:41pm PST

Westlake is the second most densely populated area in LA, a largely immigrant neighborhood, a melting pot where “families from entire apartment complexes gather for services under pop-up tents at Christmas, and mariachi music emanates from central courtyards in the summer nights.”

Long resistant to the forces of gentrification that overtook Downtown Los Angeles, Westlake is on the cusp of big change, for better or worse. We recently mapped nearly two dozen high-profile projects headed to the neighborhood, including the sale of the Westlake Theater, plans for a 41-story apartment tower, a makeover for MacArthur Park, and renovations for an old theater that will reopen as a comedy venue.

Plus, as one of our readers notes, Westlake boasts “more great old architecture than you can ogle without a crimp in your neck.”

Tiny Topanga retreat looking for a buyer for $595K

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The woodsy home has beamed ceilings and a stone fireplace

This quiet little home in Topanga may be short on space, but it certainly doesn’t lack in charm.

Built in 1959, the 520-square-foot home has one bedroom and one bathroom, but looks quite open thanks to its wide windows, skylights, and glass doors. The house has hardwood and tile floors, along with beamed ceilings, French doors, and a rustic stone fireplace.

Featuring a lovely red wood exterior, the house sits on a 9,120-square-foot lot surrounded by tall trees and vegetation. A wraparound deck offers nice canyon views and an attached garage has parking for one vehicle.

On the market for the first time since 1988 (when it sold for $220,000), the house is now listed for $595,000.

Living room with walls of glass
Kitchen
French doors
Stone fireplace
Deck looking over trees
 
 
DMS